Women in IP

Madame_CJ_Walker

In 1867, Madam C.J Walker became the first Female self-made millionaire in the United States. She did so by turning her own problem of hair loss into a business opportunity where she tested, developed and sold Madam Walker’s Wonderful Hair Grower. In just under 8 years following the opening of her business, she was a millionaire. Innovative even for her times.

Is the modern girl innovative?

“A woman is like a tea bag. You can never know the strength of that teabag until you put it in boiling water and you can see whether you are dealing with strong tea.” Mwangwashi Phiyega (First woman South African police Chief). No doubt, more women are being empowered and steered towards innovation. See, IP is an already niche area so the lipstick numbers are fewer here than in most professions.

In 2013, MIP published the Top 250 Women in IP within the United States. Some places do not even have a Top 2, so this list does things. In publishing, it did something which should become a regular occurrence for other locations globally, a recognition of women thriving within intellectual property. Not only will highlighting the women who pioneer in the protection of IP rights inspire others to follow suit, it also expands the innovative platform by allowing women to give a lot more in terms of creativity. It is true that, most educational institutions churn out graduates who upon graduation are on the auto-job seeking and not job creation settings. Naturally, the female is a problem solver and a solution giver, thus the innovation option should come easily with adequate mentoring.

There still remains the challenge in getting the female youth interested in intellectual property. Ideas are rife and in this digital age it is easier to expand knowledge and share experiences within the field, something which empowerment organisations on the internet have began to catch up on.

Here is paying homage to a few women inventors courtesy of women-inventors.com. Mary Anderson (windshield wipers 1903); Marion Donovan (Disposable Diapers 1940’s); Dr. Grace Murray Hopper (COBOL computer language 1959-61); Hedy Lamarr (Wireless communications 1941); Rachel Zimmerman (Blissymbol Printer whilst 12yrs old in 1980’s)…

To all female IP lawyers, practitioners, innovators and teachers, let your efforts shine.

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